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June 2013

Melanie Sinche

Brian

Contributed by Brian (May 30, 2013) | Determining the lab you will conduct your postdoctoral research is no small task. Moreover, choosing an advisor will be critical for your ultimate success as an independent researcher. Therefore, your options should be carefully considered and weighed within the context of the bigger picture. This is where many freshly minted PhDs will make a serious mistake.


Michelle

Contributed by Michelle (May 30, 2013) | When I am asked this question I am always reminded of the experience of a friend from grad school, who was flown in for an interview for a postdoc position with a relatively new professor. I knew the prospective advisor because he had been a scientist in a colleague’s lab before moving on to begin his own research program, and had previously approached me to see if I’d be interested in postdoc-ing with him.  Anyhow, the first thing my friend noticed was a pervasive atmosphere of tension and fear in the laboratory.


Kurt

Contributed by Kurt (May 30, 2013) | A description of an academic advisor for your postdoc can be thought of in two respects: on paper and in person. On paper there are certain things that you look for in an advisor that will reflect well on you when you take that next career step. The more successful the PI, the better chance you have of making it as a scientist. There is no doubt that it matters who you hitch your wagon to.


Uyen

Contributed by Uyen (May 30, 2013) | Before even considering a postdoc position, my recommendation to senior graduate students and young postdocs is to first spend some time reflecting on your interests, skills, and values.  MyIDP is an excellent tool to start and it was co-authored by Wisconsinite – Dr. Phillip S. Clifford – a true advocate for postdoctoral training.


H. Adam Steinberg

Artist and Scientist H.

Susan Hanson, Ph.D.

Dr. Susan Hanson received her BA in Biology and Chemistry in 2001 from Luther College in Decorah, IA and her Ph.D. in Pharmacology from Vanderbilt University in 2005 under the direction of Dr. Vsevolod Gurevich. Sue continued as a postdoc in her graduate lab for a year to complete several ongoing projects.